Reduction of the libido index was the major disadvantage that we observed with zinc supplementation. Substances that affect libido usually act centrally and may reduce desire by causing sedation or hormonal disturbances.[17] The role of elevated levels of PRL in serum as an inhibitor of sexual drive and gonadal function is well established.[18] This reduction of sex drive may occur through the modification of activity of dopaminergic neurons in the CNS that are regarded as controlling sexual motivation and function.[19] Our study demonstrated a significant increase of serum PRL level (2.9 to 7.22 ng/dl) within two weeks of supplementation of zinc (5 mg/day). This is a possible explanation for the reduced libido with increasing doses of zinc observed in this study.
MEDLINE is the U.S. National Library of Medicine's (NLM) premier bibliographic database that contains over 18 million references to journal articles in life sciences with a concentration on biomedicine. A distinctive feature of MEDLINE is that the records are indexed with NLM Medical Subject Headings (MeSH).The great majority of journals are selected for MEDLINE based on the recommendation of the Literature Selection Technical Review Committee (LSTRC), a National Institute of Health (NIH)-chartered advisory committee of external experts analogous to the committees that review NIH grant applications. MEDLINE is the primary component of PubMed, part of the entry series of databases provided by the NLM National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI). MEDLINE may also be searched via the NLM Gateway (23).
Evidence from 5 randomized studies published in the years between 2004 and 2010, has demonstrated strong evidence that aerobic exercise can benefit people with arterogenic ED. These review results of this study build on and update the evidence from studies that concluded that concluded that exercise was beneficial for people with ED and cardiovascular disorders (25–27); on ED and obesity (18) and on normal subjects with ED (24). However, studies have shown common pathway for ED, cardiovascular (28 –30) and metabolic disorders (19, 31).
Nitric oxide is made internally from L-arginine, which is an amino acid found in red meat, poultry, fish, and dairy products. In other words, L-arginine is the building block for nitric oxide, which is essential for erections. A lack of one can lead to a lack of the other. However, there’s a problem when it comes to treating L-arginine deficiency with supplements.

Damage to arteries, smooth muscles, and nerves of the penis can lead to impotence. One common cause of impotence is blood vessel and nerve damage due to diabetes mellitus. Other causes of impotence include low testosterone levels, kidney disease, chronic alcoholism, multiple sclerosis (a disease of the nervous system), atherosclerosis (leading to blood vessel hardening), surgical damage to nerves and blood vessels (for example, prostate surgery), and injury to the penis, bladder, pelvis and the spinal cord.


Qaseem, A., Snow, V., Denberg, T. D., Casey, D. E., Forciea, M. A., Owens, D. K., & Shekelle, P. (2009). Hormonal testing and pharmacologic treatment of erectile dysfunction: A clinical practice guideline from the American College of Physicians. Annals of internal medicine, 151(9), 639-649. Retrieved from http://annals.org/aim/article/745155/hormonal-testing-pharmacologic-treatment-erectile-dysfunction-clinical-practice-guideline-from
Such observations augment the need for the development of care model in sexual medicine, as it happens with every other chronic condition, such as diabetes mellitus and CVD. In addition, it becomes clear that we are running to the era where personalized medicine will replace traditional schema; diagnosis is integrated with therapy for selection of the treatment as well for monitoring the outcome. Development and adaptation of a patient-centered care model in sexual medicine will increase efficacy and safety of currently and future treatments, as well as patients’ adherence, with certain benefits not only for our patients, but also for the healthcare systems, especially in terms of cost-effectiveness.
At his last visit, Mr. Jones was prescribed Imdur (isosorbide mononitrate) to help with his heart condition. Reading through the notes, it looks like the Imdur worked. He was feeling better, so much better that he wanted to start having sex with his wife again. And here was the problem: Mr. Jone’s doctor had renewed his Cialis prescription. Quickly, I went from a moment of elation to consternation.
In addition, statins had a relatively fast effect on the problem of erectile dysfunction as compared to its role in the reduction of cholesterol, which suggest that Niacin drugs were reaching to deal with root inflammation of the mentioned problems significantly. According to the researcher Howard Hermann, Men consuming Niacin scored better on both self-reported tests associated with the function of erectile and the levels of lipids in blood.
Although there have been sufficient data on the relationship between ED and several wellrecognized risk factors which including aging, coronary artery disease, atherosclerosis, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, high blood pressure, and pelvic surgeries, little attention has been paid by the urologists to the role of lifestyle factors in ED. However, accumulating data from basic science and clinical studies have determined a link between the occurrence of ED and a number of lifestyle factors, such as smoking, obesity, alcohol consumption, and lack of physical activity. The application of findings from animal and human studies to the clinical practice regarding the modification of lifestyle factors could help to improve ED as well as reducing the risks of developing cardiovascular diseases (14).
The art of acupuncture has become the new treatment for everything from back pain, depression, and even ED. Impotence could be more of a state of mind, and acupuncture may help. Through this alternative therapy, fine needles are placed in various parts of the body to relieve pain or stress. Although there are many mixed studies for acupuncture and ED, many tend to confirm positive results. A 1999 study found acupuncture improved the quality of erection and even restored sexual activity in 39 percent of participants.
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