It is important for you to keep a written list of all of the prescription and nonprescription (over-the-counter) medicines you are taking, as well as any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring this list with you each time you visit a doctor or if you are admitted to a hospital. It is also important information to carry with you in case of emergencies.
This is one B team you want to get on pronto: A recent report from Harvard University highlighted a study that has linked low levels of B12 to erectile dysfunction. A causal link hasn’t been nailed down, but the B vitamin is used by every system in the body, particularly in cell metabolism and the production of blood — two essential factors in getting and keeping a quality erection.
Lastly, it should be remembered that many individuals without dyslipidemia take niacin as a preventative measure. If you plan to take more than about 800 mg of niacin a day, it is a good idea to have your liver tested periodically just to make sure that your liver has no problem with high-dose niacin. These liver tests are the same used to check for liver toxicity in people taking statins, from which there is a higher likelihood of liver toxicity compared to taking niacin. The principal problem from taking statins is muscle damage which is serious enough to be life-threatening. This problem does not occur with those who take niacin. Not to be forgotten, niacin has been found to prolong orgasm.
Some medical self-help books make niacin sound like a panacea for health-conscious people with rising cholesterol levels and shrinking budgets. Because this B vitamin is cheap and sold over-the-counter at drug and health food stores, people see no reason to check with the doctor before tossing back a handful of pills. What they may not know is that the high doses (1,500-3,000 mg) needed to lower cholesterol levels can cause serious complications. (As a dietary supplement, 10-20 mg is usually recommended). To add to the confusion, niacin comes in two forms: immediate- and sustained-release preparations.
Research is mixed on the effectiveness of acupuncture as an erectile dysfunction cure, but one study published in November 2013 in the Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine found that acupuncture can be beneficial for men experiencing erectile dysfunction as a side effect of antidepressants, including selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and serotonin noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs).

For many men, stopping smoking is an erectile dysfunction remedy, particularly when ED is the result of vascular disease, which occurs when blood supply to the penis becomes restricted because of blockage or narrowing of the arteries. Smoking and even smokeless tobacco can also cause the narrowing of important blood vessels and have the same negative impact. 

Over 18 million American men over 20 years old suffer from erectile dysfunction, a condition characterized by the inability to keep an erection. It’s a complex disorder brought on by a number of factors, but it’s almost always devastating for the man it affects — causing him to lose confidence in himself and different aspects of his life. The stress it causes can deteriorate relationships and lead to lost productivity at work. Health problems aren’t uncommon either. But there’s good news in all the bad; a new study finds exercise may be a simple way to get things going under the sheets again.
The substance that gives hot peppers their kick can also give you some kick in the pants: Studies have associated the natural chemical with increased testosterone levels. In animal studies, capsaicin has also shown to increase the size of sex organs, while simultaneously decreasing belly fat. A 2014 study from France also found that men who ate more spicy food had higher testosterone levels than those who ate less. You can consume capsaicin via peppers, chili powder or a cayenne supplement.
In a double-blind, placebo-controlled study, sildenafil (50 mg–100 mg) taken every night for 9 months, starting 1 month after nerve sparing radical prostatectomy was associated with recovery of spontaneous erections in 27% of patients compared with 4% of patients taking placebo (Padma-Nathan et al 2003). Schwartz and colleagues (2004), in a study of 40 potent volunteers with prostate cancer who underwent RRP, showed that sildenafil administration every other night for 6 months, substantially increases corporal smooth muscle content. The most promising prophylactic role of sildenafil is clearly the preservation of the smooth muscle of the corpora cavernosa.
However, the case is entirely different for Niacin, as it is not only relatively more convenient, but also it allows men to enjoy sex any time when they want even when they take Niacin for only one time in a day for erectile dysfunction. Niacin formulates in the form of various slow-release pills designed primarily to seep in a slow way within the human bloodstream during the course of one day.
Both patients and partners report higher levels of satisfaction (assessed with the Erectile Dysfunction Inventory of Treatment Satisfaction [EDITS] questionnaire) after sildenafil treatment relative to placebo (Lewis et al 2001). Patients receiving sildenafil had significantly higher scores (73.6 ± 3.2) than did those receiving placebo (48.4 ± 3.2, p<0.001). The scores on the partner version of the EDITS were also significantly higher among the partners of men who received sildenafil (63.9 ± 8.1) than among the partners of those who received placebo (33.3 ± 7.5, p<0.001). A high level of treatment satisfaction (65%) reported in another clinical practice study (assessed by 5-item scale) (Jarow et al 1999). Treatment satisfaction was correlated with ED severity (41% in severe, 78% in moderate, and 100% in mild ED) and etiology (56% in neurologic causes, 58% in diabetes, 35% in radical prostatectomy, 89% in psychogenic causes, and 86% in vasculogenic causes). However, no particular characteristic predicted absolute failure with sildenafil. Sildenafil also improved all aspects of health-related quality of life (assessed by SF-36 or Q13 and Q14 of the IIEF) in general ED population or subgroups such as spinal cord injuries (Hultling et al 2000; Giuliano et al 2001; Fujisawa et al 2002). Significant improvements in self-esteem, confidence, sexual relationship satisfaction, and overall relationship satisfaction after treatment of ED with sildenafil were reported by Althof and colleagues (2006) using the self-esteem and relationship questionnaire (SEAR) in a cross-cultural double-blind, placebo controlled, flexible dose study (Althof et al 2006; Cappelleri et al 2006). Treatment satisfaction is also maintained through time (Figure ​(Figure3)3) (Carson et al 2002).
The development of successful sexual behavior involves not only important neuroendocrine and local genital changes that begin at puberty, but also psychological and social influences that occur both before and after puberty.[7,8] Sexual behavior in males is regulated mainly by internal patterns of hormones; i.e. T, progesterone and PRL. These hormones are modulated by the male interactions with the social environment.[9]

Just because a product claims to be natural doesn't mean it's safe. Many herbal remedies and dietary supplements can cause side effects and dangerous interactions when taken with certain medications. Talk to your doctor before you try an alternative treatment for erectile dysfunction — especially if you're taking medications or you have a chronic health problem such as heart disease or diabetes.
Viagra is eliminated mainly by the cytochrome p450 system in the liver. Elderly men and men with liver or kidney dysfunction have reduced ability to eliminate the drug. Therefore, these patients should start with the lowest dose (25 mg) to avoid problems with toxicity. Medications that interfere with cytochrome p 450 (such as erythromycin, cimetidine, and ketoconazole) can also decrease the elimination of Viagra. These other medications should preferably be stopped when using Viagra, or Viagra should be used cautiously starting with the lowest dose.

Much of the evidence shows high rates of vitamin D deficiency in patients with erectile dysfunction. In fact, one study of 3,400 participants found that men with vitamin D deficiency were 32% more likely to have trouble with erections when all other risk factors were controlled for. It’s a little on the nose that you need vitamin D for your “D,” but hey—science can be funny too.
Before all else, try to keep in mind that no erectile dysfunction medicine is a miracle cure. The PDE5 inhibitors (sildenafil, tadalafil, vardenafil, and avanafil) work by facilitating blood flow to the penis, but they all require sexual arousal. Your body sends the necessary chemical to the blood vessels of the penis and the medication helps you to get an erection.
Risk factors for ED include older age, obesity, diabetes, heart disease, and high blood pressure. The problem is that men without issues are using these medications. "We are seeing more and more young men without any risk factors for ED asking for ED drugs. They look a lot like the young men dancing around in the TV advertisements, probably too healthy to have ED,” said Rowena DeSouza, MD, associate professor of surgery at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston and director of urology at Lyndon B. Johnson Hospital.

If you bike a lot and have a very narrow saddle on your bicycle, consider switching to a "no-nose seat" which is wider at the back than a conventional saddle, allowing more of your weight to be distributed to the sitting bones. Make sure the seat is level or angled slightly downward and at a height that allows your knee to be just slightly bent at the bottom of the pedal cycle. Raising the handlebars on your bike so that you're sitting upright may also help.
The phrase “penis exercise” actually refers to exercises known as pelvic floor or Kegel exercises, in which a man focuses on strengthening the muscles that control the flow of urine and ejaculation. These exercises are often recommended to men who are recovering from prostate cancer treatment, have problems with ejaculation, or have a hard time holding their urine, but they do not appear to help erectile dysfunction.
Dealing with erection problems can be a challenge. However, there are lots of treatments and lifestyle changes which can help. While medications such as Viagra improve symptoms in the short term, pelvic floor exercises can help you improve your sexual function in the long term. Find out why pelvic floor, also known as Kegel exercises, can be used to treat ED and how to perform the exercises correctly.
No matter what the cause of erectile dysfunction, it is likely to cause feelings of stress and other emotional reactions. It’s also not uncommon for erection problems to cause tension in a relationship, particularly if one or both partners withdraws emotionally and the problem is not talked about. And it’s possible for a man’s renewed ability to have intercourse after a period of no sexual activity to stir up relationship issues.
According to a study conducted by the University of the West of England, Bristol, pelvic floor exercises may be very effective in treating erectile problems. Many participants of the study, all of whom were men who had been experiencing erectile dysfunction for at least six months, reported a significant improvement of their condition within three months of training their pelvic floor. 
tell your doctor and pharmacist what prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, and nutritional supplements you are taking or plan to take. Be sure to mention any of the following: alpha blockers such as alfuzosin (Uroxatral), doxazosin (Cardura), prazosin (Minipress), tamsulosin (Flomax, in Jalyn), and terazosin; amlodipine (Norvasc, in Amturnide, in Tekamlo); certain antifungals such as itraconazole (Onmel, Sporanox) and ketoconazole (Nizoral); anticoagulants ('blood thinners') such as warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven); certain barbiturates such as butalbital (in Butapap, in Fioricet, in Fiorinal, others) and secobarbital (Seconal); beta blockers such as atenolol (Tenormin, in Tenoretic), labetalol (Trandate), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol XL, in Dutoprol), nadolol (Corgard, in Corzide), and propranolol (Hemangeol, Inderal LA, InnoPran); bosentan (Tracleer); cimetidine ; efavirenz (Sustiva, in Atripla); erythromycin (E.E.S., E-Mycin, Erythrocin); HIV protease inhibitors including amprenavir (Agenerase; no longer available in the U.S.), atazanavir (Reyataz, in Evotaz), darunavir (Prezista, in Prezcobix), fosamprenavir (Lexiva), indinavir (Crixivan), lopinavir (in Kaletra), nelfinavir (Viracept), ritonavir (Norvir, in Kaletra), saquinavir (Invirase), and tipranavir (Aptivus); nevirapine (Viramune); other medications or devices to treat erectile dysfunction; medications for high blood pressure; certain medications for seizures including carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Epitol, Tegretol, others), phenobarbital, and phenytoin (Dilantin, Phenytek); rifabutin (Mycobutin); and rifampin (Rifadin, Rimactane, in Rifamate, in Rifater). Your doctor may need to change the doses of your medications or monitor you carefully for side effects. Many other medications may also interact with sildenafil, so be sure to tell your doctor about all the medications you are taking, even those that do not appear on this list.
Sildenafil has been on the market for more than 8 years. Morales and colleagues (1998) provided summarized safety until 1998 and Padma-Nathan and colleagues (2002) provided long-term safety data (>4 years). The most commonly reported treatment-related adverse events are headache, facial flushing, dyspepsia, dizziness, nasal congestion, abnormal vision, and palpitation (Table ​(Table2).2). Other adverse events uncommonly or rarely reported include back pain, influenza-like syndrome, rash, vomiting, diarrhea, cardiac arrhythmia, and hypersensitivity reactions. Adverse events are dose related, mild in nature, self-limited by continuous use. The drop-out rate due to adverse events is similar to placebo (2% for sildenafil vs 2.3% for placebo). Post-marketing case series reported higher incidence of adverse events, especially for headache (9%–39%), flushing (7%–33%) and abnormal vision (5%–11%) (Zippe et al 1998; Jarow et al 1999; Marks et al 1999; McMahon et al 2000; Moreira et al 2000; Fagelman et al 2001; Guay et al 2001; Martinez-Jabaloyas et al 2001; Palumbo et al 2001). Patients may tolerate sildenafil differently based on existing comorbidities. Ischemic heart disease and hypertension are associated with higher incidence of adverse events than diabetes (3.6%, 2.3%, and 1.9%, respectively) (Padma-Nathan et al 2002). Visual disturbances (blurred vision, flashing lights, blue haze, and change in color perception) occur due to weak inhibition of PDE6 in the retina. They are coincident with peak plasma concentrations of sildenafil and are transient and fully reversible. None persisted 6 hours after taking sildenafil and rarely consist a reason to discontinue treatment.
You may know horny goat weed from its omnipresence behind the counter at your local convenience store, but this traditional Chinese formula is less sketchy than it sounds. Used for centuries to treat low libido and erectile dysfunction, the herb’s potential efficacy was show in a 2010 study published in the Journal of Sexual Medicine. Researchers who fed the supplement to rats found they had improved erectile function; another study showed that the supplement can block a natural chemical that wilts erections. (Just be warned: Viagra was found to be 80 times more powerful.)
When it comes to keeping your gut healthy and immunity strong, consuming fermented foods and probiotic supplements is essential. Probiotic foods and supplements fortify the ‘good’ bacteria that live in the gut – the all-important microbiome – which in turn protects the gut wall, regulates inflammation, and assists with hormone and neurotransmitter production. Also essential… View Article
Impotence, or erectile dysfunction (ED), is the inability for a man to sustain an erection long enough for normal, satisfying sexual intercourse.  To understand the underlying causes of impotence, it helps to know the basics about how an erection develops, along with potential problems that get in the way. Erections begin in the brain with a thought related to sexual desire. Then a chemical message travels from the brain to the penis. Blood flow to the penis increases as blood vessels leading to the reproductive system relax and allow for increased circulation.
In the 1700s, pellagra was an endemic disease in northern Italy—which had not been known until maize (corn) was introduced from America. Italy gave the disease the name, “pelle agra” (pelle means skin; agra means rough). Casal had observed that patients with pellagra were all poor, subsisted mainly on maize, and rarely ate fresh meat. Because pellagra outbreaks occurred in regions of Europe where maize was a dominant food crop, the belief was that maize either carried a toxic substance or was a carrier of disease. When it was later noted that there were few pellagra outbreaks in Mesoamerica, where maize is a major food crop (and is processed), it was considered that the causes of pellagra may be due to factors other than toxins.

A variety of personal habits and lifestyle choices have been linked to ED. In some ways, this is a good thing, since habits can be broken and choices reconsidered. What's more, many of the lifestyle factors that contribute to sexual problems are ones that affect overall health and well-being, both physical and mental. Addressing these factors, therefore, can have benefits beyond improving erectile dysfunction.
Reduction of the libido index was the major disadvantage that we observed with zinc supplementation. Substances that affect libido usually act centrally and may reduce desire by causing sedation or hormonal disturbances.[17] The role of elevated levels of PRL in serum as an inhibitor of sexual drive and gonadal function is well established.[18] This reduction of sex drive may occur through the modification of activity of dopaminergic neurons in the CNS that are regarded as controlling sexual motivation and function.[19] Our study demonstrated a significant increase of serum PRL level (2.9 to 7.22 ng/dl) within two weeks of supplementation of zinc (5 mg/day). This is a possible explanation for the reduced libido with increasing doses of zinc observed in this study.
In addition to lowering low-density and total cholesterol along with triglycerides, increasing high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) has become one of the principal objectives for treating hyperlipidemia. Considerable evidence has shown that even a minor improvement in HDL-C levels may significantly reduce cardiovascular risk. For example, it has been found that an increase of 1 mg/dl in HDL-C levels results in a parallel reduction in coronary artery disease risk by 2% in men and 3% in women. Moreover, HDL-C helps to transport oxidized cholesterol from peripheral tissues where it instigates atherosclerosis to the liver for excretion. Furthermore, HDL-C has potential anti-inflammatory, anti-thrombotic and anti-oxidant effects.

When experiencing difficulty in achieving an erection, it’s important to figure out if you are able to achieve an erection at all or if this happens only when you are with your partner. If you are unable to achieve an erection on your own, this may be more related to a medical and/or physical condition. Examples of this could include heart conditions, neuromuscular disorders, or pelvic pain. To evaluate if this is the cause of your condition, you should follow-up with your physician to examine your cardiovascular, neurological, and musculoskeletal system. From here, they may recommend medications such as Viagra or Cialis, or sometimes a referral to a urologist.

In fact, one common reason many younger men visit their doctor is to get erectile dysfunction medication. Often, men with erectile dysfunction suffer with diabetes or heart disease, or may be sedentary or obese, but they don’t realize the impact of these health conditions on sexual function. Along with erectile dysfunction treatment, the doctor may recommend managing the illness, being more physically active, or losing weight.
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