When men are given supplemental testosterone it can have positive effects on erectile dysfunction as well as the “grumpy old men” syndrome of low energy, loss of drive, low libido, and loss of endurance as well as “man boobs”.  Zinc has a direct effect on the two main enzyme systems that act on testosterone: conversion of testosterone to estrogen via aromatase and the conversion of testosterone to DHT by 5 alpha reductase.   Zinc blocks the testosterone to estrogen pathway leading to more testosterone.  It turns out that only at really high zinc levels does zinc inhibit the 5 alpha reductase enzyme so when we give mild to moderate zinc supplements, DHT actually increases because there is more testosterone to feed into this pathway.   This actually benefits things because DHT has 2-3 times the times the androgen receptor affinity than testosterone.  In any case, we see an increase of testosterone and androgenic activity from DHT with zinc supplements and whether a guy has low or normal T to begin with, there is a positive change in erectile dysfunction and libido in some men due to the increased androgenic activity and less estrogen pulling in the opposite direction.  Conversely we see testosterone levels drop when a diet is low in Zinc as well as a drop in DHT.  It is important to note that this effect of increased testosterone with zinc supplementation, while well established, does not always lead to an improvement of ED and increased Libido.
A mineral involved in muscle development, muscle is essential for reproductive function in men of every age and activity level. One study that compared athletes to non-active individuals found that supplementing with 22 mg magnesium per pound of body weight of the course of four weeks raised testosterone levels in both groups. And two separate studies, one on a group of men over the age of 65 and a second on a younger 18-30-year-old cohort, present the same conclusion: levels of testosterone (and muscle strength) are directly correlated to the levels of magnesium in the body. These are the best foods for magnesium!

In addition to male sexual health, zinc is needed for burn and wound healing, proper digestion and utilization of carbohydrate foods, including: fruits, grains, sweets and vegetables as well as protein foods like beans, eggs, tofu or meat. Zinc is also necessary for the body to manufacture at least 200 different enzymes needed for various aspects of metabolism and life. Our blood, bones, brain, heart, liver and muscles require adequate amounts of this essential mineral to function properly.
A study from 1990 (eight years before Viagra was introduced) found that sedentary but otherwise healthy middle-aged men who started an intense aerobic exercise program reported higher levels of sexual intimacy, and more reliable sexual function. Men in the study who started a walking program also experienced improvements, though not as dramatic. But the bottom line is, improved physical fitness often improves sexual functioning and satisfaction. Here are 5 exercises that can help with erectile dysfunction.
Penile implants - are generally used if physical damage (like an accident) makes the anatomical parts needed for an erection not work. These are inserted by surgery and can provide a permanent treatment choice if others fail to work. The implants can be semi-rigid or inflatable. They can be pretty expensive and are not usually available on the NHS.
If you are taking sildenafil to treat erectile dysfunction, follow your doctor's directions and the guidelines in this paragraph. Take sildenafil as needed before sexual activity. The best time to take sildenafil is about 1 hour before sexual activity, but you can take the medication any time from 4 hours to 30 minutes before sexual activity. Sildenafil usually should not be taken more than once every 24 hours. If you have certain health conditions or are taking certain medications, your doctor may tell you to take sildenafil less often. You can take sildenafil with or without food. However, if you take sildenafil with a high-fat meal, it will take longer for the medication to start to work.
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Dr. Shiel received a Bachelor of Science degree with honors from the University of Notre Dame. There he was involved in research in radiation biology and received the Huisking Scholarship. After graduating from St. Louis University School of Medicine, he completed his Internal Medicine residency and Rheumatology fellowship at the University of California, Irvine. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology.
Three of the randomized studies (25–27) that contributed to the present study data indicated the positive role of both interval and continuous aerobic training in the dual management of both ED and cardiovascular disorders (hypertension and ischemic heart disease ,respectively); this is not surprising because of the arterogenic interrelationship between ED and several cardiovascular disorders. The physiological basis for the therapeutic role of continuous exercise in the management of both ED and some cardiovascular disorders as reported in the present study, could be related to the biochemical, neural and hormonal changes in the blood vessel walls that induce an acute and long-term blood vessel relaxation. The blood vessels might relax after each exercise session because of body warming effects; local production of certain chemicals, such lactic acid and NO; decreases in nerve activity; and changes in certain hormones and their receptors (32, 33). Over time, as the exercise is repeated, there appears to be a growing evidence of a prolonged effect. Thus, chronic (regular, longterm) physical training might reduce basal concentrations of inflammatory markers.
In a study with human subjects, Kruger et al. have reported that acute changes in the normal physiological levels of PRL led to a significantly prolonged ejaculatory latency, but minor reductions of sexual drive and function.[19] Although zinc induced elevation of PRL was not an acute effect, findings similar to the human study (prolongation of ejaculation and mild reduction of libido index with medium dose of zinc) were observed in this study. However, the prolongation of ejaculatory latency may not be merely due to effects of elevated PRL because elevated PRL levels are known to be associated with the negative aspects of sexual activities (decreased sexual desire and frequency of sexual intercourse).[20]
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In the 1700s, pellagra was an endemic disease in northern Italy—which had not been known until maize (corn) was introduced from America. Italy gave the disease the name, “pelle agra” (pelle means skin; agra means rough). Casal had observed that patients with pellagra were all poor, subsisted mainly on maize, and rarely ate fresh meat. Because pellagra outbreaks occurred in regions of Europe where maize was a dominant food crop, the belief was that maize either carried a toxic substance or was a carrier of disease. When it was later noted that there were few pellagra outbreaks in Mesoamerica, where maize is a major food crop (and is processed), it was considered that the causes of pellagra may be due to factors other than toxins.

Poor sleep patterns can be a contributing factor for erectile dysfunction, Mucher says. One review published in the journal Brain Research emphasized the intricate relationship between the level of sex hormones like testosterone, sexual function, and sleep, noting that testosterone levels increase with improved sleep, and lower levels are associated with sexual dysfunction. Hormone secretion is controlled by the body’s internal clock, and sleep patterns likely help the body determine when to release certain hormones. 
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