In many of these cases, a discussion between the physician, the man with erectile dysfunction, and possibly his partner can help to resolve the issues leading to treatment failure. For men who experience severe side effects, can’t take the drugs for other reasons (such as taking medicines such as nitroglycerin), or don’t respond in spite of further education on the correct use of the drugs, there are other treatment options that can help most men remain sexually active.
What's to know about erectile dysfunction? Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a condition in which a man regularly finds it difficult to get or keep a firm erection. ED can be caused by psychological, physical, and medical reasons. This article looks at many of the causes, symptoms, and treatment options, which include medication, surgery, exercise, and diet. Read now
Much of the evidence shows high rates of vitamin D deficiency in patients with erectile dysfunction. In fact, one study of 3,400 participants found that men with vitamin D deficiency were 32% more likely to have trouble with erections when all other risk factors were controlled for. It’s a little on the nose that you need vitamin D for your “D,” but hey—science can be funny too.
Kegel exercises are very effective, simple and affordable methods in enhancing the strength of your muscles. These muscles are the ones that are involved in your sexual function. If you are unsure of the information that you read online, the best option is to talk with your doctor about your condition in order to avail of the best treatment methods for you.
But researchers emphasize that immediate-release niacin should remain as a treatment option for high cholesterol. "The point of our study is not that niacin should be avoided, but that the immediate-release preparation is the preferred form, and that medical supervision and evaluation are necessary for people taking this drug," said James McKenney, professor and chairman of the division of clinical pharmacy at the Medical College of Virginia.
In a double-blind, placebo-controlled study, sildenafil (50 mg–100 mg) taken every night for 9 months, starting 1 month after nerve sparing radical prostatectomy was associated with recovery of spontaneous erections in 27% of patients compared with 4% of patients taking placebo (Padma-Nathan et al 2003). Schwartz and colleagues (2004), in a study of 40 potent volunteers with prostate cancer who underwent RRP, showed that sildenafil administration every other night for 6 months, substantially increases corporal smooth muscle content. The most promising prophylactic role of sildenafil is clearly the preservation of the smooth muscle of the corpora cavernosa.
I use magnesium and zinc. I don’t find any difference with zinc but about 10 minutes after I pop a magnesium I’m all ready to go! But diet comes first! I went vegan about 10 weeks ago (and I’ll never look back) but I also quit my hormonal birth control about 3 weeks ago so my sex drive is at a big fat ZERO. But like I said, when I take a magnesium it still manages to come back. Mine you, I have a boyfriend who I’ve been with for 4 and a half years and I have so much love for him! But I wanna feel sexy everyday! I am losing weight so that will help and I’ve heard amazing things about Pine Pollen (tinture for men and powder for women) check it out! 🙂
In male rats, main olfactory epithelium (MOE) exerts an important role in regulating sexual behavior. Intranasal irrigation with zinc sulphate has been reported to destroy the MOE and completely abolish the sex behavior.[6] In this study supplementation of zinc was done using a feeding tube and precautions were taken to avoid contacting nasal area. Hence the possibility of reducing sexual performance due to MOE disturbance is ruled out. Some humans experience gastrointestinal irritation with supplementation of zinc.[23] If the same is applicable to animals it may be another possible explanation for the reduction of libido index with elevated doses of zinc. One drawback of our study is that we did not compare the weight of animals before and after treatment.
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Both patients and partners report higher levels of satisfaction (assessed with the Erectile Dysfunction Inventory of Treatment Satisfaction [EDITS] questionnaire) after sildenafil treatment relative to placebo (Lewis et al 2001). Patients receiving sildenafil had significantly higher scores (73.6 ± 3.2) than did those receiving placebo (48.4 ± 3.2, p<0.001). The scores on the partner version of the EDITS were also significantly higher among the partners of men who received sildenafil (63.9 ± 8.1) than among the partners of those who received placebo (33.3 ± 7.5, p<0.001). A high level of treatment satisfaction (65%) reported in another clinical practice study (assessed by 5-item scale) (Jarow et al 1999). Treatment satisfaction was correlated with ED severity (41% in severe, 78% in moderate, and 100% in mild ED) and etiology (56% in neurologic causes, 58% in diabetes, 35% in radical prostatectomy, 89% in psychogenic causes, and 86% in vasculogenic causes). However, no particular characteristic predicted absolute failure with sildenafil. Sildenafil also improved all aspects of health-related quality of life (assessed by SF-36 or Q13 and Q14 of the IIEF) in general ED population or subgroups such as spinal cord injuries (Hultling et al 2000; Giuliano et al 2001; Fujisawa et al 2002). Significant improvements in self-esteem, confidence, sexual relationship satisfaction, and overall relationship satisfaction after treatment of ED with sildenafil were reported by Althof and colleagues (2006) using the self-esteem and relationship questionnaire (SEAR) in a cross-cultural double-blind, placebo controlled, flexible dose study (Althof et al 2006; Cappelleri et al 2006). Treatment satisfaction is also maintained through time (Figure ​(Figure3)3) (Carson et al 2002).
In fact, one common reason many younger men visit their doctor is to get erectile dysfunction medication. Often, men with erectile dysfunction suffer with diabetes or heart disease, or may be sedentary or obese, but they don’t realize the impact of these health conditions on sexual function. Along with erectile dysfunction treatment, the doctor may recommend managing the illness, being more physically active, or losing weight.
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