The researchers observed that there was increase in both scores (IIEF-5 and SAT-P) in both treatment groups after 12 weeks of treatment. However, this increase was much higher in Group 1 which was given 2400 mg/day maca extract supplementation compared to the placebo group. This clearly shows that the supplementation worked well in managing erectile dysfunction among these men.
There is a wide range of methods including different medications for healing sexual disabilities in men. But nowadays more and more men are refusing from the use of outdated erectile dysfunction treatment techniques and synthetic medications. That’s why men replace them with the latest natural remedies able to gently cure the impairment of erectile function without the interference with bodily functions. Male Extra and VigRX belong to such remedies. These supplements offer the most innovative solution for the elimination of erectile dysfunction symptoms without any harm to the men’s health. These products are highly effective because they contain only the natural, fully safe active substances.
Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD, is a U.S. board-certified Anatomic Pathologist with subspecialty training in the fields of Experimental and Molecular Pathology. Dr. Stöppler's educational background includes a BA with Highest Distinction from the University of Virginia and an MD from the University of North Carolina. She completed residency training in Anatomic Pathology at Georgetown University followed by subspecialty fellowship training in molecular diagnostics and experimental pathology.

Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera), used widely in Ayurvedic medicine, holds a similar role to that of ginseng in Chinese medicine. Though unrelated to ginseng, it appears to share similar properties and actions. Ayurveda considers this herb to be a rasayana, or particularly powerful rejuvenative. The name ashwagandha means “like a horse,” connoting that it is regarded as a premier sexual tonic.

A plant like Cleome gynandra is a popular vegetable used all over Uganda and is on sale in most markets. Other medicinal plants that are food stuff include Allium cepa (onions), Allium sativum (garlic), Rhus vulgaris, Capsicum frutescens(red pepper) and Zingiber officinale (Ginger) are also on sale in most markets of Uganda and internationally. In addition, the roots of Mondia whiteii are used as an aphrodisiac for males and for improving female sexuality (women's Viagra) in most areas of Uganda11 particularly in urban centres and the Kampala City. To date, Mondia whiteii has been an old traded medicinal plant in most in Kampala. Recently the patented ‘Mulondo Wine’ a drink flavoured by the roots of Mondia whiteii has hit the national and international markets35. The Mulondo Wine is also believed to be an aphrodisiac for both men and women.
Aggressive and excessive sexual behaviour is most common cause of ED. Males practicing self-stimulation, coition, or gaining erections without ejaculation few times in a day suffer with problems like ED due to exhausted reproductive system. Tufan herbal ED pills provide natural erectile dysfunction treatment by handling effects of these practices as well. These are regarded as the best ED pills as these not only protect a male from ill-effects of these issues but also reverse their effects to improve health and energy levels of male reproductive system.
What are the alternatives to viagra? Erectile dysfunction, when a man cannot achieve or maintain an erection, is a common condition that causes much distress. Viagra is just one of several drug treatments that can help relieve the problem. Other methods and treatments can help, too, including alternative herbal remedies that people may wish to try. Read now
Prescription drugs called “oral phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE5) inhibitors” are considered the “first-line non-invasive treatment” options for patients with ED. These include the drugs that go by brand names: Sildenafil, Vardenafil or Tadalafil. They work by helping the smooth muscle cells lining the blood vessels that supply the penis with blood to work properly. This allows a man to maintain an erection more easily.
The basis of ED herbal therapies is that they are anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and immunomodulatory, and can stimulate testosterone production. On the other hand, the synthetic drugs act via NO. The principal mediator of the relaxation of corporal smooth muscle of the penis has been shown to be NO, which is released mainly from parasympathetic nerves and endothelium [13]. NO is believed to relax the corporal smooth muscle by activating soluble guanylate cyclase to increase cGMP content [14,15]. Penile rigidity depends on maximizing inflow of blood while minimizing outflow [6]. The increased blood flow in the cavernous sinuses puts pressure on the walls of the surrounding veins, causing the lumen of the veins narrow, temporarily interfering with the flow of blood but causing tumescence. Normally, the parasympathetic nerve produces Ach. Ach acts on muscarinic receptors and nicotinic cholinergic receptors. When the parasympathetic nerve is stimulated, preganglionic neurons release Ach at the ganglion, which acts on nicotinic receptors on postganglionic receptors. Postganglionic neurons then release Ach to stimulate muscarinic receptors of the target organs. The muscarinic receptor M3, present in the endothelial cells and smooth muscle, is activated, and the M2 receptor in the heart may also be activated. This may result in the production of Ach, which can cause endothelial cells to produce NO. Ach released from postganglionic parasympathetic nerves acting through G-protein-mediated muscarinic receptors and nicotinic cholinergic receptors helps to release NO. Normally, M1, M2 and M3 receptors are found in secretory glands, heart, smooth muscle and endothelial cells, respectively. M1, M2 and M3 receptors cause activation of phospholipase C and generate inositol trisphosphate and diacylglycerol, which increase calcium. Activation of M4 may inhibit adenylate cyclase, decreasing the messenger cyclic AMP. This mechanism may be involved in the relaxation and contraction of cavernosal smooth muscle cells.
Despite its cult following, there hasn’t been proper, objective research into its effects. One study published in the First International Journal of Andrology tested the herb out on a small group of young men and found that it did help with “mild ED.”  However, the researchers didn’t look into whether Maca could help with older patients who are suffering from more serious cases of impotence. On top of that, the study was focused on the patients’ perception of their own erectile issues. While ED can surely stem from psychological reasons, people deserve something that has a more credible history of solving the biological aspects to the problem.

In carrots, various nutrients can help men prevent health conditions, particularly erectile dysfunction. The lack of potassium and vitamin E is a cause of this condition. Carrot contains the great amount of potassium and vitamin E. Hence, it can correct deficiencies. Plus, antioxidants in carrot can slow the aging process down that prevents the risk of ED.


This study was carried out in areas in and around Queen Elizabeth Biosphere Reserve (QEBR) and some other sub counties such as Katerera, Kichwamba and Kitagata in Bushenyi and Munkunyu, Kayonza and Kitsinga in Kasese districts in Western Uganda. The sampling sites were located in the parishes around the biosphere reserve, and in the selected fishing villages within the biosphere reserve. These included, Katwe, Mweya, Katunguru, Hamukungu, Kahendero and Kayanja Fishing Villages and many other villages.
"Since I was a teenager I have been very shy and always felt like I couldn't approach women. I finally found a girlfriend, but things were not that great in bed I think because of my lack of confidence. Now I feel much more relaxed and I can enjoy sex like never before. It has made a big difference and I feel proud to be naked with my girlfriend for the first time!" - Steve MJ, USA
The Plant: A low-growing flowering annual that’s originally from southern Europe but is now an invasive weed in parts of the United States and Australia. The plant’s common names, like puncturevine or devil’s thorns, tells you exactly why most people hate it: it drops sharp, spiny seed pods that lie in wait for unsuspecting victims to step on them. It’s also toxic to grazing livestock like sheep.
Despite its cult following, there hasn’t been proper, objective research into its effects. One study published in the First International Journal of Andrology tested the herb out on a small group of young men and found that it did help with “mild ED.”  However, the researchers didn’t look into whether Maca could help with older patients who are suffering from more serious cases of impotence. On top of that, the study was focused on the patients’ perception of their own erectile issues. While ED can surely stem from psychological reasons, people deserve something that has a more credible history of solving the biological aspects to the problem.
Consider this:  penicillin, the first successful antibiotic, was derived from molds that inhibit bacterial growth.  Scientists had to figure out why the molds slowed bacteria, and refine the active ingredients.  Using herbal supplements is somewhat like putting mold on a wound.  It might help, a little, but it’s certainly not going to help as much as using penicillin.
ED can also occur as a side effect of some medications, for example some high blood pressure medications such as certain diuretics and beta blockers. If you think that a medication you are taking has a negative effect on your sex life, you should discuss this with your prescribing doctor. Your doctor may be able to recommend an alternative treatment.

Disclaimer: The information provided on this site is intended for your general knowledge only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice or treatment for specific medical conditions. You should not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting with a qualified healthcare provider. Please consult your healthcare provider with any questions or concerns you may have regarding your condition. Your use of this website indicates your agreement to this websites published terms of use and all site policies. All trademarks, registered trademarks and service-marks mentioned on this site are the property of their respective owners.


Consider this:  penicillin, the first successful antibiotic, was derived from molds that inhibit bacterial growth.  Scientists had to figure out why the molds slowed bacteria, and refine the active ingredients.  Using herbal supplements is somewhat like putting mold on a wound.  It might help, a little, but it’s certainly not going to help as much as using penicillin.

The proved herbal remedies with therapeutic values such as Prunus africana used in the treatment of hypertrophy in male genitalia is indicative that some herbals may be potent though not yet studied comprehensively5,13. However, most of the herbal remedies used in male ailments are not well documented and researched. The dangers of loosing valuable indigenous knowledge (IK) on sexual impotence and ED are likely to occur because westernization in the present generation. This indigenous knowledge in medicine ought to be documented for future use and sustainable utilisation19. According to the convention on biological diversity (CBD)6, specific reference is made to the need to protect the world's indigenous cultures and traditions (Art. 8 of CBD). This article points out that national legislation need to respect, preserve and maintain knowledge, innovations and practices of indigenous and local communities encompassing traditional life styles relevant for the conservation and sustainable use of biodiversity. UNEP argues nations to have an urgent action to safeguard indigenous cultures and their knowledge.


There’s no bedroom bummer quite like having to fly at half mast, but your penis problems are likely more common than you think: As many as 30 million American men suffer from erectile dysfunction, and one in four who seek treatment for ED are actually under the age of 40, according to a study in The Journal of Sexual Medicine. We all know there’s a little blue pill that can fix the failure to launch—but you don’t necessarily have to fill a ‘script to save your stiffy.

Physical and emotional stress — whether over-exercising, under-sleeping or just dealing with everyday stressors like work and a busy schedule — causes an increase in “stress hormones,” including cortisol and adrenaline. Stress can lower desire for sex. This is because stress can contribute to fatigue or preoccupation with other tasks. It can also significantly affect blood flow by increasing inflammation.

In fact, this herb has undergone many studies which link it very closely to Viagra. This is because this herb increases your overall sexual performance and desire and helps increase sperm count. There is actually a drink, whichmany people refer to as an aphrodisiac, called “Mulondo Wine,” which uses Mondia whitei as the main active ingredient. It’s termed an “aphrodisiac” because of its potential to increase sexual performance through an increased libidoand increased potency.

With wide-ranging action, ginseng (Panax ginseng), also called Asian ginseng, has been shown in human studies to have an anti-stress effect; improve physical and mental performance, memory, and reaction time; and to enhance mood. Ginseng increases physical working capacity in humans in many ways, including by stimulating the central nervous system, and regulating blood pressure and glucose levels. A 2015 study found that active constituents in ginseng had significant benefit for ED in men with diabetes.


This is the vegetable root from Peru that meets the entire health benefits. If you can add this to your diet, you will surely see the difference. Maca is highly rich in iodine, amino acids, iron and magnesium. There are three types of Maca; black, red and yellow. The black one appears to get rid of stress as you boost your memory. Stress could cause ED.
Ginkgo biloba. Ginkgo is an herb that is used in Chinese medicine that’s thought to improve blood flow. "Any ED treatment that improves blood flow may help," explains Dr. Harris. "An erection is just blood in and blood out." However, the evidence that ginkgo can improve blood flow in ED is limited, and most experts say the jury is still out. In addition, ginkgo can increase the risk for bleeding problems if combined with certain medications, such as warfarin (Coumadin).
No matter what erectile dysfunction treatment or treatments (whether herbal remedies or not) a man ultimately decides upon, experts say it's important to eat healthily and to avoid smoking and heavy drinking. Moreover, adequate exercise, stress reduction, and sleep can improve erectile dysfunction in many. In addition, says Lamm, "A loving, receptive, and responsive partner is a home run. After all, this is still a couple's issue."
This is another herb used for centuries in Chinese medicine to treat erectile dysfunction and low libido. A study from 2008 found  that the herb blocks the effects of an enzyme that restricts blood flow to the penis. Researchers believe horny goat weed, also known as epimedium, acts as a natural phosphodiesterase inhibitor, the same action as seen in erectile dysfunction drugs such as Viagra or Cialis. However, the research indicated that horny goat weed can work more effectively and cause fewer side effects than the drugs.
Many stores sell herbal supplements and health foods that claim to have sexual potency and fewer side effects. They’re also often cheaper than prescribed medications. But these options have little scientific research to back up the claims, and there’s no uniform method on testing their effectiveness. Most results from human trials rely on self-evaluation, which can be subjective and difficult to interpret.

Know that you’re not alone.  20 million American men have ED. A study showed that one quarter of men under 40 also experience it. Though this is worrisome, it also means that these issues shouldn’t be solely discussed on the shady forums and message boards in which sketchy elixirs are advertised. If you think you may have ED, just know that you don’t have to go down a internet rabbit-hole to find answers.
Reiter, W. J., Pycha, A., Schatzl, G., Pokorny, A., Gruber, D. M., Huber, J. C., & Marberger, M. (1999, March). Dehydroepiandrostone in the treatment of erectile dysfunction: A prospective, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study [Abstract]. Urology, 53(3), 590-594. Retrieved from http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0090429598005718
×