3. Testosterone replacement. Before oral medications like Viagra, testosterone was routinely used to treat erectile dysfunction as it is central in the male sexual response, including the desire for sex and the process of getting an erection. Testosterone can be administered in a number of ways, for example orally, by means of an injection, skin patch, or subcutaneous (under the skin) pellet. 
And just because you’re using a “natural” herb doesn’t mean you won’t feel any side effects. Ginseng can cause hypoglycemia or bleeding in some people, and at high doses puncturevine can damage the kidneys. Plus, the FDA has found that a lot of supplement companies make sure their erection-enhancing products actually produce erections by tossing in some Viagra off-label. If you really need it, it’s probably better–and safer–to go see your doctor for a prescription.
Eleutherococcus senticosis (Siberian Ginseng) is an overall system toner and improves performance and stamina. In the 1950's it was used extensively by Soviet athletes to enhance athletic performance. It can combat stress and is a tonic stimulant for the adrenal hormones. One of the most important active ingredients in Siberian or Oriental Ginseng is the ginsenosides, which greatly promote blood flow to the brain and peripherals, including the penis. In oriental medicine, Ginseng is highly respected and prized as a herb which promotes male or 'yang' energy, improving circulation, boosting vitality and acting as an overall systemic invigorator.

Erectile dysfunction (ED) is commonly called impotence. It’s a condition in which a man can’t achieve or maintain an erection during sexual performance. Symptoms may also include reduced sexual desire or libido. Your doctor is likely to diagnose you with ED if the condition lasts for more than a few weeks or months. ED affects as many as 30 million men in the United States.
×